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1972–1973, 1977–1987.
10 cm of textual records, 2 charts and 3 brochures.

Administrative history


The St. Laurent church formed when Ernest Dyck moved to St. Laurent, Quebec and began to do some gospel work through literature and sermons.

The first meeting place was a rented office space that had been converted into a Bible Center. It was only when more interest was shown that a Sunday service started in June 1968.

In May 1970, David Franco was appointed the first French worker to serve the congregation. He was as a graduate from Bethel Bible Institute, Sherbrooke. Shortly before that, on December 30, 1969, the St. Laurent church was accepted into the Canadian Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches.

Before purchasing their own building on May 1, 1974, the St. Laurent church had moved around 5 times during their first 6 years. The building they purchased was a duplex; only the main floor was used for the church, the upper floor apartments were rented out to help cover costs. In May 1980 however, the church sold the building and began to meet in a school auditorium due to the increase in attendance. This younger church of about 112 members, is actively focused on personal witness, evangelistic outreach and discipling new converts.

In 1973, Franco resigned to take up further studies, leaving the church without a pastor. Ernest Dyck helped out for 2 years until Pierre Wingender took over leadership. André Bourque followed in his footsteps only a few years later. The leaders of the congregation were: Pierre Wingender (1977–1979), André Bourque (1980–1986), Gérald Kraemer (1985–1988), Guy Demers (1989), Gilles Clermont (1990), Robert Godin (1991–1992), François Pinard (1993–1994), Claude Queval (1995–2000) Éric Wingender (2001–2002), and Gérard Basque (2003– ).

Scope and content

The records found in this collection consist of leadership reports, minutes from congregational meetings, financial / budget reports, member lists, a questionnaire, letters, a chart, pastoral committee minutes, brochures, an article, and a project proposal.

Custodial history

The material in this collection came to the archives July 31, 1987, deposited by Ken Reddig who copied them at the Institut Biblique Laval.

Notes

Textual file list

Volume 575 and microfilm #138
1. Development sketch of St. Laurent, Québec 1983
2. St. Laurent Church: A Brief History [1983?]
3. Letter attached with a historical sketch 1980
4. Reports 1972–1973, 1979–1987
5. Minutes from congregational meetings 1973, 1978–1987
6. Finance / budget reports 1977–1987
7. Church member list 1977–1987
8. Questionnaire 1979
9. Letters 1979
10. Pastoral committee minutes 1980–1987
11. “l’histoire de l’église des frères Mennonites” (Frères Mennonites church history brochure) [197?]
12. Mennonite Brethren Churches in Quebec 1981
13. Le Lien phonebook for the Frères Mennonite 1985
14. “Marc-Elie, jeune messager de Dieu” by Pierre Wingender [198?]
15. “L’organisation interne de l’association québécoise des églises” (Internal organization of the Québec Church association chart) [198?]
16. “Croissance des églises des frères Mennonites au Québec” (Church Growth of the Frères Mennonites of Québec)